Workshops

Paper Art: Faux-Dyed Paper and “Mark Making”

I am deeply attracted to rust-dyed papers and enjoying reading about the technique. It usually seems to involve different combinations of tea, rusty stuff, paper bundles, and a cauldron, and I don’t have room for anything remotely that big, even in my studio, which is a scant 98 square feet and filled to the rafters with ephemera and tea cups. Recently, however, I found a method of dying papers that, while it lacks the eerie depth of mark-making with rust, it is pretty darn lovely; also simple and quick, which makes for near-instant gratification.

MATERIALS:

Ink (I use a variety of fountain pen inks and homemade walnut ink)

Medium to heavy weight paper or cardstock

Small sponge

A water mister

Ink, Sponge, and Mister

These pages are to be used for a sketchbook. Rather than cut them to size, I tore them, using a ruler as a straightedge. This torn edge is pretty as it mimics a deckled edge, and it absorbs the ink.

Tearing the Edges of Paper

Dip the sponge in the undiluted ink, then dab the edges of the page around all sides.

Now spray the page with the [read more]

Paste Paper Tutorial – Decorate Your Pages

One of the most beautiful and accessible techniques for decorating pages is with paste paper. For centuries it has been used for endpapers, bookbinding, wallpaper, and other crafts. In the 17th century it was widely used by unmarried Moravian women as a way of supporting themselves at home; their work made its way all over Europe.

Recipes vary, but this is one I have used for years. The alum is a mordant, which helps the color “grab” the paper. (For my U.K. friends, alum can be bought online.)

  • ½ cup white flour (cake flour is best but if you don’t have it, don’t sweat it)
  • ½ cup corn starch/corn flour
  • 1 tablespoon alum
  • 1 cup + 1 cup cold water
  • 4 cups boiling water

Basically you are creating a homemade paste. Mix flour, corn starch, and alum thoroughly. Add one cup cold water and whisk. Add four cups boiling water and keep stirring with whisk. Place over high heat on stovetop and keep stirring. As mixture thickens, turn the temperature down and let it simmer. It is important to keep [read more]

Traveling with Your Art Journal Supplies

The first, best piece of advice I ever received about keeping an illustrated or sketchbook journal was to always, always travel with your supplies and be prepared. I take mine everywhere: walks, restaurants, museums, doctor’s offices, even church – a great place for meditative drawing. If you carry what you need with you along with your sketchbook, you will always be ready to draw at a moment’s notice, no excuses and more importantly, be ready to use small amounts of time where you might ordinarily be staring into space (traffic jams, airplanes, etc.)

If you have never kept a portable studio like this before, don’t worry. Everyone is going to work with different materials to suit their own style and needs, and you may not know what these are until you have tried it for awhile. Also, buying all new supplies can be expensive, although it is perfectly possible to keep a visual diary with little more than a good pen and a glue stick. Just get what you can and add to it when you can. For instance, I couldn’t really afford a whole set of good water color crayons in one go, so I buy one or two whenever [read more]

New Paste Paper Workshop

Join me on Saturday, May 2, for a paste paper workshop at the Garnswllt Hall Activity Centre in Ammanford. This is traditional technique similar to marbling that uses pulling, combing, and other devices to create multi-dimensional designs. Once dry, these paste paper pages can be used for a variety of paper crafts, including card making, bookbinding, and collage. From 10:00 to noon we will make unique paste paper pages. After a break for lunch, we will then use our pages in a variety of crafts from 1:00 to 3:00. The fee is £25. Please pre-register by contacting me at KellyBoler79@gmail.com.

[read more]

Beautiful Paper Dyeing With Fall Foliage and Other Leaves Using Eco Printing Techniques

A few weeks ago I was in Asheville, North Carolina. Lots of walking, lots of journal pages, and lots of leaves. I drew leaves. I photographed leaves. But I wished that there was some way to actually get a leaf onto a page, the ones that I was collecting in my pocket as we walked; a tiny bit of the walk and the day. Last year I made walnut ink for the same reason. Sure, I can buy it, but making something out of the trail and the beauty to make other things of beauty after the autumn has passed, this is – I don’t know – a kind of contract that with nature.

It is possible to incorporate flowers and foliage into handmade paper with impressive results, but I don’t make paper, I only use it for book binding and other paper arts. However, after searching about a zillion journal sites online, I found something perfect. It’s called eco-printing. Silly name, great result.

There are several different methods of eco-printing, but [read more]